How to regain control of your Facebook Feed in 3 easy steps.

Perhaps you’re like me and enjoy staying touch with friends and family, but are not super interested in being distracted by any number of the facets of modern social media. Here’s a short tip to clear up an overly busy facebook feed.

Say you have a good friend or family member who is really into a particular hobby, maybe it’s Kayaking. Now, I don’t know why people would want to kayak, since canoeing is so much more civilized, but you love them despite this one flaw. 😉

Step one: Find this little inverted v and select it

2016-05-25 13.34.20

Step two: You may need to select the option for more as seen below

2016-05-25 13.36.40

Step three: Hide all posts from that page!

2016-05-25 13.38.11

Victory!!!!

While I illustrated this with a little bit of humor, you could easily apply it in an effort to seek that your facebook feed is filled up with things, noble, pure and good, and to keep out the few weeds that sometimes crop up

Before you hit “share” or “like”

Php4.8

Philippians 4:8 (NASB95)
8 Finally, brethren, whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is of good repute, if there is any excellence and if anything worthy of praise, dwell on these things.

Before you hit “share” or “like” on that post or funny story, let it simmer for a bit and consider Paul’s admonition from Philippians 4.

  • Is it true… Each and every day, hyped up fear fed articles are posted about new applications, foods, vaccines, politics, local events, the family next door… Many of them are just not so. Simple common sense should tell us that 1/2 of these things are not so, and discretion  should eliminate the rest. If it is really that important take the time to do some fact checking.
  • Is it honorable… Not every noteworthy event in life needs space in our heads. Mark you space with things worthy of real honor.
  • Is it right… Fanning the fire of rebellion towards things that are truly right tears down the very ones who need help the most
  • Is it pure… It helps to become a little savvy with social media. Sometimes an old friend, will pass along a great uplifting story, but they shared it from a Facebook group or page that either has a foul name, or commonly passes along material filled with profanity. Make a choice to check out first if the story is true, then find a clean source to share. Not only will you help yourself, you help those who you want to encourage.
  • Is it lovely… Your kids and grandkids are, that 14th million share of “people of Walmart” is not…
  • Is it of good repute… Remember your reputation. When you share that page, your character goes with it, for good or ill, they will be latched together from that point on. Do you really think those 2 or three good things are worth the filth one needs to swim through.
  • Is there any excellence… Is this really what it seems to be, and does it provide the best you want those whom you care about and lead to follow. Does it raise the bar?
  • Is it worthy of praise… Life is already full of enough sorrow, our broken hearts desperately need things worthy of praise and rejoicing.

Remember,

Proverbs 4:23 (NASB95)

23 Watch over your heart with all diligence, For from it flow the springs of life.

Growing Up with Social Media

via Letterbox:

Letterbox-Social-Feature-728x364

As society hurtles towards its increasingly digital future, we all have to accept that children are starting their journey into the online world at a much younger age than any of us did and experience far fewer barriers (they’ll never know how lucky they are not to hear a dial-up tone). LETTERBOX has been looking into the effects that the digital age is having on younger minds and has generated the fascinating infographic below that’s teeming with interesting details.

For example, did you know that there are more than 5 million users below the age of ten on Facebook, despite the minimum age requirement being 13? Of these users, over 200,000 of them are aged six or younger. These statistics and others listed below all point to the incredible fact that the average age for a child to start regularly consuming online media is now only 8-years-old.

GrowingUpSocial_728x5349_Compressed

Some of the statistics covered in our infographic may seem shocking, but they’re not necessarily doom and gloom statistics. Here at LETTERBOX, we realise that the future of entertainment is increasingly becoming screen-based, but we believe there can be a healthy balance between traditional entertainment and online interaction in your child’s life.

Talking to mothers of young children, we found that the online safety of youngsters is a very common worry. Amelia Henderson, a 34-year-old mother from Kent told us about her own concerns.

“My nine-year-old was so insistent that she wanted a Facebook account, but I was so worried about her signing up. I’m glad to see from this research that my concerns are a common challenge for young people online,” she said. “Children’s tablets and other online parental tools are giving me the confidence that the web can be safe.”

One innovation we are planning to bring into the LETTERBOX collection in time for our autumn catalogue is the Kurio children’s tablet computer. This 7-inch Android powered device features extensive and easily configurable parental settings. These can control when and for how long the tablet can be used, what can be viewed online, which apps can be accessed and many other aspects. The Kurio isn’t a dumbed down child’s tablet, but is a fully featured device that has been designed and optimised for a younger audience.

We still strongly believe that traditional values are an important part of every childhood, even with the surge in interactive media and online interaction outlined in this infographic. Our collection will always include traditional fun such as doll houses, learning toys, outdoor games and so much more to keep children’s playful imaginations as bright as they always have been.